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Paramedic Treats Man Who Attacked Him and His Partner

— After he had his hand fractured in an attack by a patient, John Liddle continued to treat the man for another half hour.

GREAT HARWOOD, England — A paramedic continued to treat a patient who attacked him and fractured his hand.

Accrington Observer reported that paramedic John Liddle responded to a scene after his colleague needed help with a violent patient.

When Liddle arrived, he found paramedic Andrew Ormerod “covered in blood,” and an off-duty police officer restraining the patient.

The patient then attacked Liddle when he began to treat him, and fractured his hand.

“Andrew was covered in blood, I didn’t know if he’d been stabbed, or if the blood was coming from the patient so I was quite shaken at this point,” Liddle said.

“I went to have a look at the patient to find out what was happening but unfortunately he stamped his foot on my hand. As horrible and violent and nasty as he was, he’s still my patient and I have just got to do the job. We try to switch off. We do care for people and that’s what we are here for, not be attacked while doing our job.”

The two paramedics continued treating the patient for another 35 minutes.

“The adrenaline had kicked in; it wasn’t until we got to hospital that I thought ‘my hand’s hurting.’ The consultant said it’s quite a difficult bone to break which just gives an indication of the force that was used,” Liddle said.

Liddle will be unable to work for six weeks, and Ormerod was assigned to the control room.

Ambulance service manager Ian Walmsley said they are pushing for the patient to be prosecuted for his “vile and disgusting behavior.”


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Troy Shaffer
Troy Shaffer

About the Author: Troy is an Air Medical Career Expert passionate about a team approach to improving air medical safety from the ground up. Troy is a former Army medic, Army pilot, Coast Guard pilot and EMS pilot. Troy has taught hundreds of wannabe flight medics, flight nurses and EMS pilots the exact steps needed to launch air medical careers.

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