Join the Crew Newsletter. Over 23,187 signed up:

Man Gets 20 Years For Attacking Paramedic

Man Gets 20 Years For Attacking Paramedic

George Hosey was in jail when he assaulted the paramedic who came to treat him.

GOLIAD COUNTY, Texas — George Hosey, 47, was sentenced to 20 years in prison and fined $10,000 for the March 2014 assault of a paramedic.

Hosey was in the Goliad County Jail in March 2014, charged with retaliation, a third-degree felony that is still pending. This charge was in connection of a 1985 shooting of a game warden.

During Hosey’s stay in the Goliad County Jail, he complained of pain and a head injury, so a jail employee called a paramedic to treat him, said Assistant District Attorney Reid Manning.

Hosey then struck the paramedic three times in the head with his hands.

Throughout the trial, the jury heard about Hosey’s lengthy criminal history. He faced one of his most serious charges when he was 15.

At that age, he and his father, Amos Hosey, were charged with shooting Velton Williams, a game warden in Goliad County, on Sept. 28, 1985.

In 1990, George’s father, Amos Hosey, was convicted of attempted capital murder of Williams and sentenced to life in prison. In 2013, he died in prison.

The prosecution, meanwhile, dismissed the attempted capital murder of Williams charge against George Hosey. The younger Hosey instead pleaded guilty to burglary of a vehicle and was sentenced to 10 years probation. During this probation, however, he left the state and lived under the alias Jerry Malone. He was extradited to Texas in 2004.

The assault of a public servant charge Hosey was on trial for this week in Goliad is a third-degree felony, which carries a punishment of two to 10 years in prison. But, because of his prior convictions, the punishment range was enhanced to two to 20 years in prison.

Manning and Assistant District Attorney Tim Poynter prosecuted the case.


Want EMS and air medical tips sent straight to your inbox? Get The Net newsletter. Sign up here (it's free):

Ohio Bill Will Make Killing First Responders A Death Penalty Crime

Ohio Bill Will Make Killing First Responders A Death Penalty Crime

The proposed legislation also includes killings of current or former military members.

CLEVELAND — A bill in the Ohio state House Legislature would add killing a first responder or military member to the list of slayings eligible for the death penalty.

Rep. Dave Greenspan, a Republican from Westlake (a suburb of Cleveland) is spearheading the proposal. The bill would address fatal attacks on firefighters and emergency medical service providers.

The legislation in the House Criminal Justice Committee would also include killings of current and former military members including reservists and national guard members.

Killing a police officer is already a crime eligible for the death penalty.\

Rep Greenspan says “I was inspired to act by cases in recent years nationally and in Ohio of attacks on police, fire and military personnel.”

Greenspan tells Cleveland.com the goal is providing a strong deterrent.


Want EMS and air medical tips sent straight to your inbox? Get The Net newsletter. Sign up here (it's free):

EMS Concealed Carry Law: 5 Things You Need To Know

EMS Concealed Carry Law: 5 Things You Need To Know

Support for EMS and firefighters to legally carry weapons on duty is steadily growing.

READ ON